Plastic Surgery

Doctor Plastic Surgery

John M. Menezes, MD
Plastic Surgery, Cleft Lip and Palate Repair

Photo: John Menezes, M.D.

Dr. John Menezes, an associate professor with the UNLV School of Medicine, is the only fellowship-trained –Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine —  craniofacial surgeon in Las Vegas.

Among his areas of expertise are cleft lip and palate repair, craniosynostosis, ear reconstruction, microsurgery, and adult and pediatric facial trauma.

(702) 671-2278 Office
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Article Plastic Surgery John M. Menezes, MD

Cleft and Craniofacial Surgery

Dr Menezes Photo

If your child has a cleft lip and/or palate or other craniofacial disorder a good place to start is with the UNLV Medicine Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery team.

Each child is an individual, however, and you should be sure to discuss your child’s unique situation during your first appointment with Dr. Menezes and the UNLV Medicine multi-disciplinary management team.

Article

Leaving Them Smiling

For children with rare conditions, UNLV Medicine surgeon restores the ability to show happiness.

It’s a procedure that leaves both the patient and the surgeon with smiles on their faces.

Surgery to correct the effects of Moebius syndrome – a rare congenital condition that can paralyze a person’s entire face and affect muscles that control back and forth eye movement – can make it impossible for a person to show that sign of happiness that most people take for granted

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UNLV Physician’s Skills Include Craniofacial Surgery

Photo: John Menezes, MD

Moebius syndrome — a rare congenital condition that can paralyze the entire face and affect muscles that control back-and-forth eye movement.

To unlock Moebius paralysis — it affects something we take for granted, the ability to smile — is something that Dr. John Menezes, an associate professor of plastic surgery with the UNLV School of Medicine, has been trained to do.

Article Richard Baynosa, MD, FACS Plastic Surgery By Jessie Bekker Las Vegas Review-Journal

UNLV Plastic Surgeon Reattaches Roper’s Thumb

Photo: Ben Mays with Dr. Richard Baynosa

Ben Mays held his nearly severed thumb, dangling by a ligament, in his right palm as he rode his 17-year-old quarter horse Bubby out of the South Point Arena and across the parking lot to an ambulance.

He swung the doors open, held out his dangling digit to show the stunned paramedic inside, and handed his horse over to another roper. Then he climbed in and held a bag of ice on his thumb — still shoved inside the white glove he had been wearing — as first responders sped him to University Medical Center in Las Vegas.