In the News

Overview

In the News

Photo: Dr. Files Meets with President after Las Vegas shooting

Good things are happening at UNLV Medicine, the medical practice where UNLV School of Medicine doctors treat patients.

Here you will find the latest news stories and contact information for media relations. Our media relations team is available to assist with news inquiries involving UNLV clinics, doctors, patients, and programs.

If you are a journalist looking for more information about UNLV Medicine clinics, or the UNLV School of Medicine, our media relations team can help you with:

  • Setting up interviews with our expert physicians and other healthcare professionals
  • Access to our facilities for reporters/photographers/videographers and news crews.

We look forward to working with you. You can find more information about UNLV Media Policies, or contact our manager of media relations, Mr. Paul Joncich at (702) 895-1696 for stories about our doctors and medical clinics.

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Family Medicine Photo

Family Medicine Clinic

UNLV Medicine Family Medicine Providing Wide Range of Services

The UNLV Medicine Family Medicine Clinic handles around 11,000 patient visits per year, including expectant mothers, children, adults, and the elderly, as well as the Golden Knights and Aviators.

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Surgeon Encourages Minority Students to Pursue Medical Careers

The story that ran in the Las Vegas Review-Journal last May was compelling. Mary Kay Duda’s life was saved by UNLV Medicine’s Dr. Charles St. Hill.

St. Hill, one of only three fellowship-trained surgical oncologists in Nevada, performed a complex 10-hour surgery known as a Whipple procedure to remove a large tumor that enveloped her pancreas.

“I’ve been given the gift of life,” a grateful Duda would later tell St. Hill and reporter Jessie Bekker.

Inspirational Goals

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Pediatric Surgeons

UNLV Medicine Pediatric Surgeons

UNLV Medicine Brings More Pediatric Surgeons to Las Vegas.

They cannot always say what’s bothering them. They cannot always answer medical questions. They are not always able to be patient and helpful during a medical examination.

Yes, children are definitely not small adults in so many ways – they behave differently, they require specific testing for their specific illnesses, they need special techniques for procedures. Clinicians must always take into account the immature physiology of the infant or child when considering symptoms, prescribing medications, and diagnosing illnesses.

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UNLV Medicine’s ENT Team

Dr. Robert Wang — he completed his residency in otolaryngology at Harvard, one of the nation’s most celebrated medical schools, and his head and neck fellowship at M.D. Anderson, the world’s most renowned cancer institute — is upbeat on a recent early April morning.

Yes, on this day where the sun had yet to make its first appearance, no one could accuse the chairman of the UNLV School of Medicine Department of Otolaryngology- Head & Neck Surgery of not accentuating the positive.

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Rooman Ahad Photo

Child Neurologist Aids Children with Developmental Disorders

Busy physician and mother Rooman Ahad balances caring for other people’s children with raising her own young ones.

In many ways Rooman Ahad typifies a working mother with two young children. She gets the kids dressed for school, makes breakfast, packs their lunches (her husband helps when he can), and then drives her little ones to preschool and grade school before heading off to work.

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Dr John Fildes Excellent Emergency

Excellent in an Emergency
Dr. John Fildes' youthful interest in medicine turned into a successful lifelong career

While Dr. John Fildes’ interest in medicine began as a youngster, it was what he saw working in a hospital during college that spurred his interest in trauma care.

Working in a variety of hospital jobs in New York state, Fildes said he saw many people die following car wrecks and industrial accidents — people he thought could have been saved if the hospital had had better acute care capabilities.

Today Fildes serves as the inaugural chair of the UNLV School of Medicine surgery department and is know worldwide for his work in trauma medicine.

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Leaving Them Smiling

For children with rare conditions, UNLV Medicine surgeon restores the ability to show happiness. It’s a procedure that leaves both the patient and the surgeon with smiles on their faces. Surgery to correct the effects of Moebius syndrome – a rare congenital condition that can paralyze a person’s entire face and affect muscles that control back and forth eye movement – can make it impossible for a person to show that sign of happiness that most people take for granted.

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Dr. Deborah Kuhls

Dr. Deborah Kuhls Reflects on Mass Shooting

They sought a carefree weekend out on the town.

Some were from Vegas, many drove in from Southern California, and others journeyed on a plane to escape the worries of their everyday lives.

That’s what set the evening apart from so many others that Dr. Deborah Kuhls has spent in UMC’s trauma center. 

Article Pediatric
Dr. Michael Scheidler

Pediatric Surgeon Dr. Michael Scheidler

The story of how Dr. Michael G. Scheidler, the son of a mailman and the youngest of eight children, became one of the nation’s top pediatric surgeons is one of perseverance. 

Though the chief of pediatric surgery at the UNLV School of Medicine couldn’t see himself becoming anything other than a physician, that vision wasn’t always shared by educators.

Read the full story here.

Article Plastic John M. Menezes, MD
Dr Menezes Photo

Cleft and Craniofacial Surgery

If your child has a cleft lip and/or palate or other craniofacial disorder a good place to start is with the UNLV Medicine Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery team.

Each child is an individual, however, and you should be sure to discuss your child’s unique situation during your first appointment with Dr. Menezes and the UNLV Medicine multi-disciplinary management team.

Article Cardiology & Pulmonology
Endocrinologist Dr. Amber Champion

Dr. Amber Champion is a Champion for Her Patients

If you ask Dr. Amber Champion why she’s now a UNLV Medicine endocrinologist with an emphasis in diabetes, she begins by telling you a story that’s set in Australia, a story about an abnormally hungry 27-year-old medical student who ended up in the emergency room with blurry vision and an unquenchable thirst — a young woman whose car broke down, whose bicycle burned up.

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Dr. Randy St. Hill with patient Mary Duda and family

UNLV Surgical Oncologist Performs 10-Hour Whipple Procedure

As doctors wheeled 75-year-old Mary Kay Duda into surgery for a pancreatic tumor, she turned to her daughter, Katie, and said, “See you on the flip side.”

Katie Duda, 36, rolled her eyes at the memory, humorous now that her mother is nearing two years cancer-free. At the time, though, the thought of losing her mother was unbearably real.

Mary Kay Duda says she’s one of the lucky unlucky ones. Unlucky in that the tumor growing inside her enveloped the head of her pancreas. Unlucky in that one Las Vegas surgeon declined to operate because the tumor was so large.

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Dr. Joseph Thornton, colorectal surgeon

Dr. Joseph Thornton on Overcoming Obstacles

Dr. Joseph Thornton’s road to becoming a physician makes you realize yet again that where there’s a will, there’s a way.

He grew up in a single parent household on the south side of Chicago, the son of an African American bartender who wanted the best for her son. His two aunts, both maids, also lived in the home.

“Combining incomes made the housing affordable,” says the 72-year-old colorectal surgeon who now is an associate professor in the UNLV School of Medicine’s Department of Surgery. “For good times they loved to go to the racetrack and watch the horses run.”

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Dr. Jennifer Baynosa

Dr. Jennifer Baynosa, Surgical Oncologist

From her extended family what Dr. Jennifer Baynosa often heard as a child was that one day she would find a nice man, fall in love, get married, and have a family.

Taking care of her children and her husband, preparing their meals and washing their clothes, was the future that would be hers.

Article Ackerman Autism Center
Dr. Mario Gaspar de Alba at UNLV's Ackerman Center for Autism.

Dr. Mario Gaspar de Alba
Helping Children, Advancing Diversity

Social inequities have long been pointed to as reasons for the shorter life spans of minorities, including less access to healthy food, clean water, health insurance, and good medical care. That differential access, which can lead to chronic conditions such as obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and high blood pressure, makes having a baby more dangerous.

Article General KSNV-TV
Dr. Bardakcioglu (L) two of his patients, and KSNV-TV news crew

Groundbreaking Robotic Surgery

UNLV Medicine Dr. Ovunc Bardakcioglu, successfully performed a breakthrough surgical procedure using a new robotic device that required no incision through the skin, significantly shortened recovery time, and lessened the chances of infection.   

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Photo: John Menezes, MD

UNLV Physician’s Skills Include Craniofacial Surgery

Moebius syndrome — a rare congenital condition that can paralyze the entire face and affect muscles that control back-and-forth eye movement.

To unlock Moebius paralysis — it affects something we take for granted, the ability to smile — is something that Dr. John Menezes, an associate professor of plastic surgery with the UNLV School of Medicine, has been trained to do.

Article Richard Baynosa, MD, FACS Plastic
Photo: Ben Mays with Dr. Richard Baynosa

UNLV Plastic Surgeon Reattaches Roper’s Thumb

Ben Mays held his nearly severed thumb, dangling by a ligament, in his right palm as he rode his 17-year-old quarter horse Bubby out of the South Point Arena and across the parking lot to an ambulance.

He swung the doors open, held out his dangling digit to show the stunned paramedic inside, and handed his horse over to another roper. Then he climbed in and held a bag of ice on his thumb — still shoved inside the white glove he had been wearing — as first responders sped him to University Medical Center in Las Vegas.

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Dr. Nadia Gomez at the UNLV OB/GYN Clinic.

Dr. Nadia Gomez OB/GYN

Dr. Nadia Gomez sits in her UNLV Medicine office off West Charleston Boulevard and recalls how her parents, both physicians who specialized in obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN) , made house calls — when her family lived in Nicaragua.. 

It is lunchtime — she eats in her office because of a busy schedule — and the director of the minimally invasive gynecology surgery division at the UNLV School of Medicine says she sometimes accompanied her parents to see patients.